Admission of Kansas under the Wyandott constitution
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Admission of Kansas under the Wyandott constitution speech of Hon. Stephen A. Douglas, in reply to Mr. Seward and Mr. Trumbull. by Douglas, Stephen Arnold

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Published by Printed by L. Towers in [Washington] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Slavery -- United States -- Speeches in Congress,
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 1857-1861,
  • Kansas -- Politics and government -- 1854-1861

Book details:

Edition Notes

Series19th-century legal treatises -- no. 57806.
ContributionsSeward, William Henry, 1801-1872., Trumbull, Lyman, 1813-1896.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination8 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16322360M
OCLC/WorldCa29739784

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Kansas Constitutional Convention: A Reprint of the Proceedings and Debates of the Convention Which Framed the Constitution of Kansas at Wyandotte in July, Also, The Constitution Annotated to Date, Historical Sketches, Etc. [Larimer, Harry G. (compiler)] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Kansas Constitutional Convention: A Reprint of the Proceedings and Debates of the. Admission of Kansas under the Wyandott constitution: speech of Hon. Stephen A. Douglas, in reply to Mr. Seward and Mr. Trumbull. Within two months, the congressmen voted to 73 to admit Kansas under the Wyandotte Constitution. William H. Seward of New York introduced a separate bill in the Senate on Febru A long-time champion of the free-state cause in Kansas, Seward appealed for immediate action, but the admission bill was carried over to the next session. The Wyandotte Constitution admitted Kansas as a free state, although it was not the first choice. There were four constitutions made for Kansans to vote on, the Topeka Constitution, the Leavenworth Constitution, the Lecompton Constitution and the Wyandotte Constitution.

  On Janu , the Senate finally voted to make Kansas a state under the Wyandotte Constitution by 36 to A week later, the House voted to The bill reached President Buchanan, who was still in office, on January He . Contents of the Wyandotte Constitution. The convention drafting the constitution was held between July 5, and on J , at Lipman Meyer's Hall just north of Kaw Point in the former community of Wyandotte (which is now part of Kansas City, Kansas in Wyandotte County, Kansas). Adoption. The Wyandotte Constitution was approved in a. When the lame duck President James Buchanan signed the bill approving the Wyandotte Constitution on Janu , Kansas was admitted to the Union as the 34th state, and it marked the end of five years of bitter conflict over slavery in Kansas Territory. Within two months, the congressmen voted to 73 to admit Kansas under the Wyandotte Constitution. William H. Seward of New York introduced a separate bill in the Senate on Febru A long-time champion of the free state cause in Kansas, Seward appealed for immediate action, but the admission bill was referred to committee and finally carried over to the next session.

Wyandotte Constitution, in the period immediately preceding the American Civil War, document under which Kansas was admitted to the Union as a free state (Jan. 29, ), concluding the struggle known as Bleeding Kansas. In April, Kansas was admitted under the Wyandotte Constitution. On Janu , the admission of Kansas as a free state became effective. The constitution particularly established that Kansas would be a free state rather than a slave state. Upon official information having been by him received of the admission of Kansas into the Union as a State, it shall be the duty of the Governor elect under the Constitution to proclaim the same, and to convene the Legislature, and do all things else necessary to the complete and active organization of the State Government. SEC. The present Constitution of the State of Kansas was originally known as the Wyandotte Constitution to distinguish it from three proposed constitutions that preceded it. The Wyandotte Constitution was drawn up at Wyandotte (now part of Kansas City) in July , and was the fourth constitution voted on by the people of Kansas Territory, as the battle between proslavery and antislavery forces.